#Ge·no·zid·blogger e.V.
17 Mar 2019

Text & Translation: Corinna

#Stalin’s Genocide in the Ukraine

In the winter of 1932/33 Stalin starved the Ukrainian people to death in order to undercut any attempts at independence. Ukrainians call this event Holodomor – ‘death by hunger’.

The Holodomor has not much in common with the Holocaust, however, Raphael Lemkin described it as genocide. He noted that at first it wasn’t planned to exterminate the entire Ukrainian population, but the intellectual, political and religious elite, which was relatively small and therefore easy to eliminate. In the 1920s and 1930s, many teachers, writers, artists, thinkers, clergymen and politicians were arrested, deported or even liquidated.[1]

‘This isn’t just a case of mass murder. It’s a case of genocide, of destruction, not just of individuals, but of a culture and a nation.’[2]Raphael Lemkin

Photo: Holodomor Memorial in Kiew by Steve Haslam/www.flickr.com/Creative Commons

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17 Mar 2019

Text & Translation: Corinna

#Climate Change & Genocide

At first glance, climate change and genocide seem to have nothing in common, but if you combine them with the keywords “scarcity of resources” and “living space”, you get a bigger picture. If one follows the apocalyptic predictions, then the earth will be uninhabitable in a relatively short time. But even the more conservative studies predict that millions of people will be affected by global warming. Climate protection will thus become one of the greatest challenges facing humanity – especially in relation to genocide.

Photo: Shever/www.flickr.com/Creative Commons

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9 Dec 2018

Text: Corinna

#Genocide vs. Crimes against Humanity

Genocide and crimes against humanity are two concepts in international law; created in response to the atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis against the European Jewry. Hersch Lauterpacht shaped the concept of ‘crimes against humanity’ and Raphael Lemkin coined the term ‘genocide’. But what is the difference between these two?

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24 Oct 2018

Guest Post by Vasilina

#Myanmar and the United Nations

The aim of this post is to show the importance of the United Nations (UN) in inter- and intrastate conflicts on the example of Myanmar. The article will focus on the work of the UN and its agencies as well as their impact on the conflict in Myanmar.

3952415622_90f8ee31ff_bFoto: Julian Rotela Rosow/www.flickr.com/Creative Commons

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9 Oct 2018

“East West Street. On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity.” by Phillipe Sands

“East West Street” is a really interesting and revealing book by Phillipe Sands, which consists of two main stories: the first one is Sands’ personal family story and about the lives of his Jewish relatives before, during and after the Holocaust. The second story is about the beginnings of international law in context of the Holocaust and how it formed our modern understanding of human rights.

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25 Aug 2018

Here you can find a non-exhaustive reading list of books on genocide. We will continually add to the list, but if you have book tips please send an e-mail to kontakt@genozidblogger.de.

#text books

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31 May 2018

#Genocide Prevention: preventing mass atrocities

What can the international community, governments, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations do to prevent genocide and to build resilience to genocide in at-risk states?

The Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation published a Policy Brief by Dr. Deborah Mayersen with ten practical and evidence based measures towards genocide prevention: http://www.auschwitzinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/AIPR-Brief-Building-Resilience-to-Genocide.pdf

6 May 2018

Text: Corinna/ Translation: Miriam & Daniel

#The Holocaust

The Holocaust is viewed as the exemplary model of a genocide and is often used as a comparison for judging the different defining characteristics of a genocide. Even the UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide was passed on the 09th December 1948 under the motto “Never again” in response to the Nazis’ destruction of the Jews. Since the Holocaust plays a central role in genocide research, you can find various articles about this subject on our blog.

We will begin with the persecution and discrimination of the Jews between 1933 and 1941.

Photo: Thomas Matthias

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6 May 2018

Text: Corinna/ Translation: Miriam & Daniel

#Homosexuals and the Nazis

Despite homosexual activities being punishable acts in the Weimar Republic, the homosexual scene in Germany flourished. The social acceptance of gay men and lesbian women grew: associations were founded, bars and clubs were opened, and magazines were published. The Nazis viewed this as decadent and felt responsible for eradicating the vice of homosexuality. Beginning with the take-over of power in 1933, the Nazis started to persecute homosexual men. Hundreds were sent to concentration camps, associations and societies were disbanded, bars and clubs were closed, any gay publications were prohibited and homosexuals were forced into hiding.

Photo: Ludovic Bertron/www.flickr.com/Creative Commons

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24 Nov 2017

Text: Corinna/ Translation: Miriam & Daniel

#European colonialisation of the Americas

In 1492, Christopher Columbus discovered America – or rather the Caribbean islands; the American mainland was ‘discovered’ shortly after that. It was, however, by no means uninhabited. The American indigenous population, colloquially known as ‘Indians’, colonised the continent more than 12,000 years ago when northeast Asian inhabitants crossed the Bering Strait.

Photo: Boston Public Library/www.flickr.com/Creative Commons

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